Downland Calendar 2019

09 September John Hazard
Due to popular demand and the success of the last calendar, Fulking villagers are putting together another photographic calendar to be published in 2019. The aims are to celebrate the beauty of our village and the South Downs, and to raise funds for Fulking Village Hall. So — please email your best photos of the following: Fulking and environs through the seasons, landscapes of the South Downs, scenic Downland villages, also wildlife, farming life, community life. The email address is photos@fulking.net. You will be fully credited and receive a free copy of the calendar.

Photos should be landscape format [horizontal] if possible, and preferably of a minimum pixel dimension of 2500 x 1700. Deadline for photo submissions: May 31, 2018. Please get snapping and send in those submissions!

Jen Green (552)

The Adventure of the Twenty Oxen

King Henry VII in the Star Chamber, July 1504

King Henry VII in the Star Chamber, July 1504

Over the centuries, residents of the parish of Edburton have been involved in all kinds of litigation. But the available records only document a single occasion on which one of these affairs ascended to the legal stratosphere that the Star Chamber used to represent. The case involved twenty oxen that may, or may not, have been stolen from Perching Manor.

KING & QUEEN’s ALMONER v. COOKE.
Dated 15 Feb., 4 and 5 Philip and Mary (1557-8).
No bill or other pleading.

Interrogatories to be ministered to John Cooke of [Edburton], co. Sussex, yeoman of the Queen’s Guard, and Thomas Cooke, his brother, concerning the unlawful taking and detaining of twenty oxen which were late of the goods of Edward Lawes, late of Pearching, “ffealon of hymselff”.

The interrogatories inquire (1) how many, and the names of those who took the cattle out of the pasture at Pearching, after the death of Edward Lawes; whither the oxen were driven, and in whose keeping they are; (2) Whether Edward Lawes did in his life-time sell the said oxen to John Cooke and William Davys, and for what sum of money, and upon what conditions.

John Cooke of Edburton deposes that the oxen were taken by his brother, Thomas Cooke, at his commandment, in the high way at Edburton, and driven to Waltham in Essex, and that eighteen were sold to Mistress Stacye, and two to a servant of Mr. Wrothe.

Thomas Cooke of St. Martin le Grand, in the City of London, haberdasher, deposes the taking of the oxen to Waltham.

The outcome of the case is unknown — the relevant documents disappeared in 1719.
[Excerpt from Percy D. Mundy, ed. 1913 Abstracts of Star Chamber Proceedings relating to the County of Sussex, Henry VII to Philip and Mary, Lewes: Sussex Record Society, page 102.]

Saddlescombe Farm

Feeding lambs

Lambing Open Days — 24th, 25th, and 31st March plus 1st April 2018, 10:00am–4:00pm. No need to book — just turn up.

Please join us on our working farm for our annual lambing open days here at Saddlescombe. We open our gates for our visitors to see us at our busiest time and share with us the hustle and bustle of our farmyard during lambing. Our visitors will see newborn lambs and maybe a lamb being born, an amazing experience. We are keen to share the respect and care we give our sheep right the way through to when we sell them for meat. Our own delicious lamb burgers will be available for a tasty lunch plus vegetarian food and refreshments from the Wildflour Cafe here at Saddlescombe Farm. Tractor and trailer rides will be running subject to weather conditions. There will be activities running for children from the National Trust (bread making on the 24th March) RSPB (25th March and 1st April), Red Fox Forest School (24th and 25th March), also local butchers Garlic Wood will have a butchery stall selling Saddlescombe meat and other local produce to take home.

Saddlescombe Farm nominated for CPRE award

Saddlescombe Farm award

Saddlescombe Farm is run by tenant farmers, Camilla and Rory Puzey who open their doors to the public for lambing weekends and educational visits throughout the year. They also offer a unique Shepherd for the Day experience and Green Gym sessions which encourage people to get fit by doing conservation work. The couple say the shepherding idea came from a friend. The idea quickly developed and now the farm holds a variety of shepherding experiences for individuals, couples and families — there are even corporate team building events which conclude with a Shepherding Challenge.

The South Downs Sahara (update)

Greening the desert
A couple of years ago we noted that, according to a then newish SDNPA website, Fulking was in the midst of a desolate area in which it was almost impossible to buy or eat local produce. Saddlescombe Farm provided a single exception — they were the only local food producers, valiantly raising sheep on sand. A recent check on the site suggests that the situation has changed — slightly. Rushfields now appears on the map, as does a remarkable B&B that somehow manages to coexist in both Poynings and Pyecombe (with the same postcode) — they serve English breakfasts (pigs from Coombes, presumably). Springs also makes an appearance (salmon from the Adur?). Still, it is reassuring to be able to infer from the SDNPA’s map that all of our neighbourhood gastropubs (Fox, Oak, Plough, Shepherd, Tottington) have been resolute in their resistance to the ‘local produce’ fad. Corned beef from Argentina still rules the menu.