Local Walks

The Shepherd and Dog Fulking

From the Shepherd and Dog

  • A Walk Down The Street: less than a mile but packed with sixteen pages of history. You hardly need a map but one is provided in any case.
  • A five mile circular walk from South Downs Discovery that takes the bostal to the top of the Downs, follows the South Downs Way west for a while, then climbs Edburton Hill to Castle Ring before descending into Edburton and returning to Fulking via Coles Automotive and the path through the fields behind Perching Hovel Wood. No map but reasonably clear directions.

National Trust Walks

Their web site currently offers seven professionally produced local walks as PDFs that can be conveniently printed, complete with relevant photos and OS map extracts:

From Devil’s Dyke

Devil's Dyke

  • An Urban75 report of a circular walk (five miles?) down through the gorge to Poynings, across the fields to Fulking, and then back up the escarpment to the Dyke. No map but lots of photos.
  • A seven mile circular walk from Country Walking. A professionally produced PDF with a couple of photos and a good map.
  • An eight mile circular walk following the South Downs Way to Truleigh Hill, then heading south to Southwick Hill, before returning to the Dyke via the Sussex Border Path. Several photos and a usable map.
  • A thirteen mile circular walk from The Guardian that follows the South Downs Way from the Dyke to Upper Beeding and then loops back via Southwick Hill, Monarch’s Way and Saddlescombe. Clear directions and a schematic map that will need to be augmented by OS Explorer 122.

The Gorse Fox

The Gorse Fox
This site once had a nice collection of South Downs Walks, all illustrated by numerous photos and small but useful maps. Here are three that are fairly local to Fulking and Edburton:

  • A nine mile circular walk taking in Fulking Hill, Tenant Hill, Mile Oak Farm, the Southwick Tunnel, and returning via Thunderbarrow Hill, Bushy Bottom, and the South Downs Way.
  • Another nine mile circular walk, this one via Poynings, Saddlescombe, Wolstonbury Hill, and Newtimber.
  • An eight and a half mile circular walk that notionally starts in Bramber but can just as well be started in Edburton using the steps behind Springs Smoked Salmon. It will take you from Edburton Hill to Truleigh Hill, down to St. Botolph’s, and then back via Upper Beeding, Windmill Hill, and Truleigh Manor Farm.

The Argus

The Argus Walks
The Argus has a huge archive of Sussex walks, mostly circular ones provided by Eddie Start. Apart from the title photo, they are not illustrated. But the directions are very detailed and they all come with rather small schematic PDF maps (you will need to fiddle with the settings for your printer if you decide to print the maps out). Here are some examples:

  • A three mile walk taking one from Fulking to Edburton across the fields behind Perching Hovel Wood and back along the foot of the Downs passing the the restored lime kiln.
  • A four mile walk which takes in Fulking, Poynings, and three pubs. The map is poor.
  • A six and a half mile walk from Woodmancote to Small Dole via Oreham Manor, returning via New Hall and Spring Hill.
  • Another six and a half mile walk, this one from Henfield to Albourne via Blackstone, returning through Woodmancote and Henfield Common. Note the corrections in the comment.
  • A seven mile walk that takes one from Edburton Hill to Mile Oak via Truleigh Hill and Thunders Barrow, then back via Summers Deane.

More here: Clayton, Devil’s Dyke to Ditchling Beacon, Ditchling, Ditchling Beacon, Foredown_Tower, another Henfield walk, the Jack and Jill windmills, Lancing Ring Nature Reserve, Pyecombe, and Saddlescombe.

Poynings

Poynings

Henfield

Henfield Common

Steyning

Steyning, Bramber, Upper Beeding
Half a dozen professionally designed PDF walks with photos, clear instructions and detailed maps. The first three are the ones closest to Fulking and Edburton:

Walking Maps

Maps
These are mostly professionally designed PDF maps prepared by various branches of local government showing bridleways, byways, public footpaths, open access areas and relevant parking places for the Downs north of Brighton. They are a useful supplement to OS Explorer 122 because you can see at a glance where a walk will take you.

WSCC has a useful ‘public rights of way’ map on-line. For planning a walk, it is both more detailed and more accurate than Google Maps. But they do not make it easy to print out the parts that you will need to carry with you.

If any local resident would like to contribute their own favourite walk to this page, please contact GJMG with details.

January 9th 2014: NT links updated.
March 25th 2016: many dead links repaired.
February 17th 2017: walk added.
March 16th 2017: link to WSCC iMap added.