Edburton Tithe Map

This website frequently makes use of clips from the Edburton Tithe Map of 1842 to illustrate posts. Not a lot has changed hereabouts in the last 180 years so the map is still both useful and attractive. If you have ever wondered how such a map came to be, then the West Sussex County Record Office has an interesting recent post by Abigail Hartley, their Searchroom Archivist. She uses Edburton as an example of a tithe map that is still in superb condition. The map shows the ecclesiastical parish of Edburton, the area served by St. Andrew’s, and thus shows all of Fulking, together with Edburton proper.

The map is still available from the Record Office (details via the link above). Local walkers are probably best advised to order the JPEG version and copy it to a tablet or mobile phone for consultation in situ. Unlike a large scale OS map, the tithe map does not mark the status of routes as ‘bridleways’, ‘public footpaths’, etc. If you are relatively new to the area, and plan to use the map for walking, then you may want to use an image editor like Photoshop to copy those indications over from OS Explorer 122.

A tithe map, like the Domesday Book, is ultimately about taxation. To that end the Edburton map uses colour to distinguish between the buildings then used for human habitation (red) and all the others (grey), typically agricultural buildings for animal accommodation or feed storage. That distinction alone tells us quite a lot about mid-C19 activity in the central section of The Street (between the pub and the building now known as Yew Tree Cottage).

Another feature of the tithe map, not shared with any of the various iterations of OS maps, is that it records the names of (all!) the fields. These names are often full of information, thus ‘Fulking Mills’ is located just where two of the local spring streams merge, an ideal location for fulling mills; ‘Coneybeare’ and ‘Upper Coney Burrow’ were probably both once sources of rabbit meat, the latter conveniently placed for the Perching Manor dinner table; ‘The Rookery’ and ‘Hog Pasture’ need no translation; and nor does ‘Boggy Lagg’ if you make the mistake of traversing it in mid-February with the wrong shoes on.

Bobservation No. 67: Conservation & Covid-19

Image of virus over Fulking EscarpmentConservation Area Conclusion Decision
Recent meetings by the inhabitants of the Downland parishes have reached a decision that, in order to protect the integrity of the Downland area, the Mayfield planning proposal should be moved from just north of Henfield to a situation to the north of Fulking bordered by Clappers Lane in the East, Holmbush Lane in the North, Small Dole in the West and the Edburton Road in the South . Surprisingly, this proposal engendered no objections whatsoever. It is anticipated the work will commence as soon as the Coronavirus runs its course. 1/4/20

Coronavirus Sundries
Great effort by the village led by the Parish Council to help any villagers who may be in need of supplies, prescriptions etc. As a vulnerable oldy my most grateful thanks to them.

Fulking Fair on hold for the minute. I must admit that at this point in time cancellation looks likely. If so it will be announced. Postponement is difficult but not impossible and could tie in with a celebration when (if?) we return to normal.

Bluebells will be good this year and at worst worth a look over the gate. If you phone 271 maybe we can organise individual walks around but this must be strictly accordance to the Government’s rules. Whatever, we will be restricted to a wave as a greeting!